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言葉の海
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3,956 リアクション
28 7月
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escapekit:

One Day

a unique series of landscapes in which Japanese photographer Ken Kitano uses long exposures to capture sunrise to sunset throughout the course of one single day. 

(出典: mymodernmet.com)

2,345 リアクション
26 7月
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enochliew:

The Fine Art of Japanese Cuisine by Sheharzad Arshad

A homage to Katsushika Hokusai.

(出典: sheharzad-arshad.deviantart.com)

49 リアクション
26 7月
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rarum:

Lomography Petzval Lens TOKYO TOWER by sunuq on Flickr.
351 リアクション
26 7月
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julieyumi:

ぐるぐる - guru guru - round and around, spinning

julieyumi:

ぐるぐる - guru guru - round and around, spinning

226 リアクション
22 7月
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japanloverme:

It’s summertime in Japan and the yummiest way to cool down is with our favorite shaved ice dessert (with syrup and condensed milk and known to be smoother than a snowcone and fresh like snow*) ~ kakigōri !!  ✧ ✧ ✧ So, wanna know about this delicious dessert’s past?   Kakigōri’s history is surprisingly very old, and dates back to the 11th century. The syrup used back then was extracted from flowers and fruits. The ice was only available during wintertime, so it was stored in specialized ice houses.  Gathering and storing ice was so painstakingly difficult back then, so kakigōri was such a huge luxury. Only the rich people and the highest officials could afford it! (ノ;o;)ノ~┻━┻ Japan then started to import ice from North America, in the hopes of making kakigōri more available to the public. But the travel time was too long (it took 6 months by ship) so they looked for other ways to obtain ice.  A food merchant, Kahe Nakagawa, soon discovered he could supply “Hakodate Ice” gathered and delivered from Hokkaido to Yokohama (and turn it into a business, of course)! Because of the ice supply, soon, the first ever kakigori shop was opened. The ice used back then was hand-shaved, until the ice-maker was invented in the Meiji period and the ice-shaving machine was invented in the Showa period. Soon, the delicacy became very popular and people started experimenting with syrup flavors and toppings~ And that’s how kakigōri came to be! ヽ(・ω・。)ノ ~~~ Do you have a similar shaved ice dessert in your country too? Share it with us!  Keep cool, JapanLovers! ヽ(。ゝω・。)ノ Reference: http://goo.gl/eNACQLwww.japanlover.me
Art by littlemisspaintbrush

japanloverme:

It’s summertime in Japan and the yummiest way to cool down is with our favorite shaved ice dessert (with syrup and condensed milk and known to be smoother than a snowcone and fresh like snow*) ~ kakigōri !!

✧ ✧ ✧

So, wanna know about this delicious dessert’s past?

Kakigōri’s history is surprisingly very old, and dates back to the 11th century. The syrup used back then was extracted from flowers and fruits. The ice was only available during wintertime, so it was stored in specialized ice houses.

Gathering and storing ice was so painstakingly difficult back then, so kakigōri was such a huge luxury. Only the rich people and the highest officials could afford it! (ノ;o;)ノ~┻━┻

Japan then started to import ice from North America, in the hopes of making kakigōri more available to the public. But the travel time was too long (it took 6 months by ship) so they looked for other ways to obtain ice.

A food merchant, Kahe Nakagawa, soon discovered he could supply “Hakodate Ice” gathered and delivered from Hokkaido to Yokohama (and turn it into a business, of course)! Because of the ice supply, soon, the first ever kakigori shop was opened. The ice used back then was hand-shaved, until the ice-maker was invented in the Meiji period and the ice-shaving machine was invented in the Showa period.

Soon, the delicacy became very popular and people started experimenting with syrup flavors and toppings~

And that’s how kakigōri came to be! ヽ(・ω・。)ノ

~~~

Do you have a similar shaved ice dessert in your country too? Share it with us!

Keep cool, JapanLovers! ヽ(。ゝω・。)ノ

Reference: http://goo.gl/eNACQL

www.japanlover.me

Art by littlemisspaintbrush

5 リアクション
21 7月
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moonbentos:

The Well Loved Standard BentoSummer Break Bento #1
This is the first bento in my 30 days of bento cookbook. It’s also the bento I’ll be making for lunch on Tuesday.
Mini hamburgers
Broccoli
Cherry tomato
Carrot kinpura
Omelet
Noriben (seaweed bento/seaweed rice)
This lunch should be pretty easy to make, but it’ll be an experiment for my taste buds. As this bento title suggests, noriben is a pretty standard bento choice in Japan. It’s easy (rice, nori, and a bit of soy sauce) and pretty traditional as Japanese flavors go. Back when I was first beginning to make bentos, I made a noriben and hated it. I like everything that’s in it, but there was something about the soggy nori that I just couldn’t take. However, that was years ago and I’m willing to try it again. After living in Japan for a collective year and a half now, my taste preferences have expanded so I think there’s a chance I’ll like it now.
I’ll report back with a picture of my bento later!

moonbentos:

The Well Loved Standard Bento
Summer Break Bento #1

This is the first bento in my 30 days of bento cookbook. It’s also the bento I’ll be making for lunch on Tuesday.

  • Mini hamburgers
  • Broccoli
  • Cherry tomato
  • Carrot kinpura
  • Omelet
  • Noriben (seaweed bento/seaweed rice)

This lunch should be pretty easy to make, but it’ll be an experiment for my taste buds. As this bento title suggests, noriben is a pretty standard bento choice in Japan. It’s easy (rice, nori, and a bit of soy sauce) and pretty traditional as Japanese flavors go. Back when I was first beginning to make bentos, I made a noriben and hated it. I like everything that’s in it, but there was something about the soggy nori that I just couldn’t take. However, that was years ago and I’m willing to try it again. After living in Japan for a collective year and a half now, my taste preferences have expanded so I think there’s a chance I’ll like it now.

I’ll report back with a picture of my bento later!

214 リアクション
20 7月
Reblog
~のに!

julieyumi:

Today’s belated Japanese lesson is 「~のに」 ( _ no ni)!

Although JP-EN dictionaries define it as “although”, “even so”, “in spite of”, and “despite”, the phrase doesn’t really have an English equivalent (see examples below).  More than having a literal meaning, it gives a sentence a disappointed “so why (did this happen)?!” kind of feeling.

Usage:
(1)  ___A___のに、___B___.
Despite __A__, ___B___.

(2, whiny)  ___A___のに!
But 
__A__!!  ;A;

Examples:
(1)  あんなに勉強したのに、どうして不合格なのだろう.
anna ni benkyou shita NO NI, doushite fugoukaku na no darou?
I studied that hard, so why did I fail?

(2)  行くなと言ったのに、彼は出かけていった。
iku na to itta NO NI, kare wa dekaketeitta.
I told him not to go, but he went out anyway.

(3)  どうして食べないの。せっかく作ったのに
doushite tabenai no?  sekkaku tsukutta NO NI
Why don’t you eat it?  Even though I went through all the trouble of making it…

(4)  楽しみにしていたのに 
tanoshimi ni shiteita NO NI
And I was looking so forward to it…

1,458 リアクション
20 7月
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Zipper Jully 2014

Zipper Jully 2014

(出典: popteen-tv)

49 リアクション
19 7月
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184 リアクション
16 7月
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nihongogogo:

Inspired by this post by julieyumiThe following can also double as questions by merely using a rising intonation when you say them:そう? Is that so?また? Again?まだ? It hasn’t happened yet?いや? Is that bad?たいへん? Is it serious/difficult?Click for more Lilly lives on!

nihongogogo:

Inspired by this post by julieyumi

The following can also double as questions by merely using a rising intonation when you say them:
そう? Is that so?
また? Again?
まだ? It hasn’t happened yet?
いや? Is that bad?
たいへん? Is it serious/difficult?

Click for more Lilly lives on!

4,483 リアクション
14 7月
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Watashi no seida...
Watashi no seida...

(出典: kuraishi)

6 リアクション
13 7月
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maruhi:

鬱蒼

maruhi:

鬱蒼

6,579 リアクション
10 7月
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(出典: amemome)

35 リアクション
10 7月
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http://lovejapanwilltravel.tumblr.com/post/91342795066/the-strangest-thing-just-happened-i-was-cooking

lovejapanwilltravel:

The strangest thing just happened.

I was cooking dinner when the doorbell rang.

Outside (with my neighbor) was one of my 6th grade boys. At first I thought that my neighbor must be his mother, but after a few sentences she checked her mail and left.

He came all by himself just to talk to me!

256 リアクション
07 7月
Reblog
come and go

julieyumi:

来い - koi - come (order, masculine)
来て - kite - come (order)
来た - kita - (someone) came
来る - kuru - (someone) will come
来ない - konai - (someone) won’t come
来れば - kureba - if (you/someone) comes…
来たら - kitara - when/if (you/someone) came/comes…
来なければ - konakereba - if (you/someone) doesn’t…